Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Financial mess goes mainstream

When Saturday Night Live actually starts making fun of the price-tag of a new social program, be very afraid...

Saturday, November 14, 2009

H1N1 finally peaked?

Seasonal influenza in the United States normally peaks around the end of February in late winter. Swine flu, however, may have peaked 3 1/2 months earlier, in early November. If the new downtrend in influenza-like illnesses continues, then the worst may be over for H1N1.


Sunday, November 08, 2009

To be free, or not to be free

Tomorrow (November 9) marks the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, a symbolic event that punctuated the roughly two year-long collapse of the Soviet Union and its Communist satellites from 1989 to 1991. The wall itself held East Berliners captive for 28 years, but if we include the entire post-war Soviet occupation along with the Nazi regime (National Socialists) then eastern Germany was under one form of socialist dictatorship or another for 56 years. Fortunately for Germans, the world in 1989 recognized tyranny for what it was, even when wrapped in the good intentions of egalitarianism, and pressure was brought to bear on the inhuman regimes in Eastern Europe and Russia.

My, how times have changed. Today we are on the brink of a major loss of liberty right here in the nation that used to be the champion of freedom around the world. Americans are only one Senate vote away from becoming sheep to a government health shepherd that's ready to tell us what we can't eat, what we can't do, and how we should live our lives.

Not ironically, our President Dear Leader B. Hussein Obama has declined an invitation from those liberated Germans to attend the ceremony commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Sunday, November 01, 2009

H1N1 Red Alert - or not.

Thanks to the H1N1 "Swine Flu" virus, more Americans are now ill with influenza than at any time in the past 3 years. However, the mortality rate due to influenza is still lower than the typical mid-winter rates from regular seasonal flu.This is welcome news, because it means that H1N1 is currently milder and less deadly than regular influenza. Hopefully the current outbreak will effectively inoculate the population against future H1N1 outbreaks before the virus has a chance to mutate into a more deadly strain.